How Much Does It Cost to Rent a Storage Unit?

At a glance

Whether you’re stashing unused furniture, renovating parts of your house, or moving into a smaller home, there are tons of reasons to rent a self-storage unit. And whatever your reason—whether you’re moving or you simply need extra space—you’ll have to factor self-storage costs into your budget.

Storage unit costs vary, but the main factor is size: Rates are higher for larger units, so it’s important to find a rental storage unit that matches your load. You’ll also pay a premium for amenities like climate control.

We’ll dive into which storage units are best for what and compare storage unit prices so you know what to look for as you shop around with our best storage companies.

Storage unit average monthly price range

TypeRent per month
Standard storage unit$60–$180
Climate-controlled storage unit$75–$225
Type
Standard storage unit
Climate-controlled storage unit
Rent per month
$60–$180
$75–$225
Sign up for our moving guide!
It can take three months or more to plan your entire move. That's why we've put together 13 emails full of tips, discounts, and checklists to help you tackle your move week by week. We've thought of everything—so you don't have to.

The whole picture

There are two types of storage facilities: interior (or indoor) and drive-up access (a.k.a. outdoor).

Interior facilities house storage units inside a larger building, which means getting your belongings into your unit might require some extra legwork, but these spaces are generally more secure than outdoor units.

Interior units offer more protection from pests and theft and can be climate-controlled, which is why inside storage units are better for valuable or fragile items.

Outdoor units, on the other hand, are more akin to garages. Drive-up access storage facilities are more convenient than indoor facilities because they allow you to pull your vehicle right up to the space to unload. However, they lack certain amenities like electrical access and climate control.

Little pin

THE MORE YOU KNOW

THE MORE YOU KNOW

Interior facilities are more common in urban areas since they’re more space-saving, while drive-up access storage facilities—which can accommodate cars and are larger—are typically found in rural areas.

Self-storage unit prices

Storage units can cost anywhere from $60 to $225 per month depending on the location, the size of the unit, and whether or not the unit is climate-controlled. Storage unit prices fluctuate by location, so take this into account when you’re looking at the average cost to rent.

For instance, in a city as densely populated as Los Angeles, a 10 ft. x 10 ft. unit could set you back as much as $215 per month. But if you live in a Colorado suburb, storage unit rents run as low as $95 per month. 

Climate-controlled storage will always be more expensive than regular storage units: Costs can be anywhere from 25% to even 50% higher.1 We’ll get into what climate-controlled storage units are all about—and when you might choose one—down below.

Storage unit cost comparisons

5’ x 5’5’ x 10’10’ x 10’*10’ x 15’10’ x 20’
Average price per month$60$70$110$130$180
Average climate-controlled price per month$75$88$138$163$225
Works forFew boxes or furniture itemsStudio or 1-bedroom apartment 2-bedroom apartment 1–2-bedroom house; small vehicle or boat3–4-bedroom home; large vehicle, trailer, or boat
Best forCollege students storing items for the summerStoring seasonal itemsStoring a few rooms’ worth of stuff Renovations/remodels Home remodels
Average price per month
Average climate-controlled price per month
Works for
Best for
5’ x 5’ 5’ x 10’ 10’ x 10’* 10’ x 15’ 10’ x 20’
$60 $70 $110 $130 $180
$75 $88 $138 $163 $225
Few boxes or furniture items Studio or 1-bedroom apartment 2-bedroom apartment 1–2-bedroom house; small vehicle or boat 3–4-bedroom home; large vehicle, trailer, or boat
College students storing items for the summer Storing seasonal items Storing a few rooms’ worth of stuff Renovations/remodels Home remodels

*Most popular storage unit size to rent
To calculate costs for this table, we averaged the average storage unit costs in all fifty states. Climate-controlled storage costs are based on a 25% increase over regular storage unit prices.

Although the storage sizes listed in the table are the most popular, we also found these storage options in our research:

  • 5’ x 15’
  • 10’ x 15’
  • 10’ x 25’
  • 10’ x 30’
  • 12’ x 15’
  • 12’ x 25’
  • 15’ x 20’
  • 17’ x 20’
Light Bulb icon

INSIDER TIP

INSIDER TIP

Wondering if you can store that 10-foot fish tank you have for your Amazonian fish collection in your storage unit? We got you. Check out our Storage Unit Dos and Don’ts to learn more.

Storage unit cost factors

There are a few things that affect the rental price of a storage unit—here’s what you need to know:

Type of service

Full-service storage includes pickup and delivery and is pricier as a result. You’re paying for the hauling service and a longer rental contract—most full-service storage comes with a minimum required number of months.

Self-service is entirely DIY and definitely the cheaper of the two, but if you don’t have the manpower or a vehicle to haul all your things to your storage unit, it might not be your best choice. The convenience that full-service storage offers can be worth the extra Benjamins.

Size of unit

The more cubic feet a storage unit has to hold multiple rooms’ worth of furniture (or a car), the more it will cost you. If you only have smaller items, like a motorcycle or an old ping pong table, you can save money by choosing a smaller unit.

Seasonal demand

Self-storage prices tend to rise at the end of the summer, when people stash things like water sports vehicles away for the winter. The more in demand storage units are, the more storage facilities increase their starting rates.

Unfortunately, locked-in rates aren’t super common in the self-storage world, but companies should notify you of any price spikes at least a month out.

Location of facility

Storage units are in higher demand—and more expensive—in big cities like New York and Washington, DC. Houses and apartments in cities tend to be smaller, increasing people’s need to store the belongings that don’t fit into their current pad, like extra beds or pieces of furniture.

Location of unit within facility

Interior units that are easier to access or more secure cost more money. For instance, units on the first floor or units near the elevator typically fall in this camp.

Bullhorn

PRO TIP

PRO TIP

Since storage units are generally more expensive in big cities, it’s worth looking into cheaper storage units in nearby suburbs if you don’t need frequent access. If you’re storing in the city, learn how to pack a storage unit to better maximize your space (and your budget).

Amenities to consider

When you’re comparing storage unit rents, it’s also helpful to check out any added amenities that might fit your specific needs.

Climate-controlled storage units

When it comes to valuable objects like a TV or computer, we recommend climate-controlled facilities—especially in areas with extreme temperatures. Climate control protects the organic materials in your furniture and clothes from humidity and heat and your electronics from the cold.

Furniture, electronics, books, and clothing are safest when stored in climate-controlled units. Check out our list of the Best Climate-Controlled Storage Companies to see who we recommend.

24-hour access storage units

Twenty-four-hour access storage units are less widely available than standard storage units but can be equally valuable. This added level of convenience is worth the extra price, especially if you plan on accessing your unit often or use the space to house expensive equipment.

For example, if you’re a DJ and you use a storage facility to store $10,000 worth of DJ equipment, returning it to your unit after a late-night gig is a much safer, more convenient option than leaving it in your car overnight.

Plus, some storage units even have 24/7 security guards, so you don’t have to wander around alone during those late-night visits.

Heads up exclamation

HEADS UP

HEADS UP

A good way to gauge a storage facility’s security level is if they have video cameras and keypad entry in place. The cheaper the unit, the lower the level of security you should expect.

Storage unit insurance costs

The same way you’d want auto insurance before you drive your car, storage insurance can ease your worries about not being able to keep an eye on your things 24 hours a day.

Insurance deductibles for storage units range from $100 to $500, depending on the amount of coverage you opt for.

Of course, smaller and larger amounts of coverage are also available. The more expensive the insurance, the higher the coverage on vermin, flood, fire damage, etc.

Average storage insurance monthly rate

Coverage amountCost per month
$1,000–$4,000$6–$12
$5,000–$10,000$15–$18
$10,000–$15,000$20–$25
Coverage amount
$1,000–$4,000
$5,000–$10,000
$10,000–$15,000
Cost per month
$6–$12
$15–$18
$20–$25

Some facilities require their tenants to purchase insurance, but luckily most homeowners insurance policies also cover items in storage—just at a lower coverage limit.

Before you rent, speak with the facility’s manager about whether or not you need insurance.

Let’s recap

Now that you’re an expert on all things storage units, here are a few steps to take before you commit:

  1. Figure out which type of storage units are available to rent in your area (i.e., interior or drive-up units), and find one that has the amenities you need (like full-service pickup and delivery).
  2. Pick a size that best suits your storage requirements. Here’s a refresher:

Compare storage unit prices

Storage unit sizeBest forAverage self-storage price (per month)
5’ x 5’Few boxes, one or two furniture items$60
5’ x 10'Seasonal items (e.g., lawn mowers, boxes of Halloween decorations)$70
10’ x 10’A few rooms’ worth of stuff$110
10’ x 15’ and 10’ x 20’An entire home’s worth of stuff; cars, boats, ATVs, or motorcycles$130–$180
Storage unit size
5’ x 5’
5’ x 10'
10’ x 10’
10’ x 15’ and 10’ x 20’
Best for Average self-storage price (per month)
Few boxes, one or two furniture items $60
Seasonal items (e.g., lawn mowers, boxes of Halloween decorations) $70
A few rooms’ worth of stuff $110
An entire home’s worth of stuff; cars, boats, ATVs, or motorcycles $130–$180
  1. Talk with your storage facility to see if they require insurance, and check your homeowners insurance policy to see if you’re covered.

If you’re sold on the cost of renting a storage unit and want to know which companies are the best in the business, give our Best Self-Storage Companies list a read.

Here’s a recap of our top self-storage companies:

These 10 US Cities Cost the Most per Square Foot

The 10 Most Expensive Cities per square

Have you ever felt frustrated by jaw-dropping housing costs? Whether you’re looking to buy or planning to rent, it can be expensive—especially if you live in certain areas.

We looked through the 200 most populous cities in the US and made a list of the top 10 cities with the highest price per square foot for both renting and owning.

If you’re headed to one of these spots, renting a storage unit could help you save money without losing all your elbow room in that studio apartment.

What are the most expensive cities?

Most expensive cities to rent

  1. San Francisco, CA
  2. Oakland, CA
  3. New York, NY
  4. Sunnyvale, CA
  5. Boston, MA
  6. San Jose, CA
  7. Jersey City, NJ
  8. Washington, DC
  9. Los Angeles, CA
  10. Fremont, CA

Most expensive cities to own

  1. San Francisco, CA
  2. Boston, MA
  3. Honolulu, HI
  4. New York, NY
  5. Fremont, CA
  6. San Jose, CA
  7. Washington, DC
  8. Glendale, CA
  9. Los Angeles, CA
  10. Oakland, CA

What is the median cost per square foot?

For our research, we looked at the 200 most populous US cities to identify the cost per square foot to rent a one-bedroom apartment or buy a home. The cost per square foot was calculated by using the median list price (for homes) and the median rent (for apartments).

If you’re scratching your head trying to remember “median” from math class, here’s the gist: we examined all the prices from the most to least expensive and then looked at the amount of the price ranked in the middle—the median.

Why does it matter if you’re renting or buying?

When you buy a home, you negotiate the final cost up front. Even if you get a loan to cover the cost, you still know what the total amount will be and when you’ll finish paying it off.

When you rent, you make monthly payments as long as you live there. And unless you’re lucky, those rent payments will likely increase over time.

In our rankings, many of the same cities make our lists of both renting and owning. Consider the fictional example of Gotham City (everyone wants to live near Batman).

Example: Gotham City

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$55$950
To rent (annual cost)
$55
To own (annual cost)
$950

You would pay $55 per year for each square foot if you’re renting—or $950 total for each square foot if you’re buying.

To put that into context, let’s say you live in a 1,000-square-foot home or one-bedroom apartment. Renters would pay $55,000 in housing costs per year, while homeowners would fork out a lifetime total of $950,000.

Both numbers are a bit alarming—and that’s why cities like this make our list. We want to give you a heads-up.

You may also want to consider using a storage unit for your extra stuff instead of using high-cost real estate at your home. This approach gives you the option of still living in your city of choice while keeping costs down.

What cities have the highest costs per square foot?

Even though we have two top 10 lists (one for renters and one for buyers), the same 12 cities take up all the spots. We break these down for you in alphabetic order, beginning with Boston, Massachusetts, and ending with Washington, DC.

Boston, MA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$46.50$742.20
To rent (annual cost)
$46.50
To own (annual cost)
$742.20

Boston is the place to go if you’re a bandwagon sports fan—its four major sports teams have racked up nearly 40 championships. But you’ll be paying for more than season tickets if this is your moving destination.

The city is the fifth-most expensive per square foot in the US for renters—and the second-most expensive for homeowners. For a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, you’re looking at $46,500 in rent each year. If you’re buying, that’s a hefty total of $742,000.

Any leftover money can go to food. In this case, you may be limited to Boston baked beans.

Freemont, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$41.36$648.15
To rent (annual cost)
$41.36
To own (annual cost)
$648.15

Fremont is an ideal location if you plan to commute to college—it’s remarkably close to 31 different schools, including Stanford and Berkeley. Plus, Fremont is only 40 miles away from San Francisco (number one on our lists), so you can take advantage of all its amenities without having to pay to live there.

But you’ll still pay quite a bit. The city is the tenth-most expensive per square foot in the US for renters—and the fifth-most expensive for homeowners.

For a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, you’ll pay $41,360 per year in rent. If you can afford to buy, expect that to cost $648,150.

Keep forgetting how to spell your city’s name? Just remember that Fremont has one “e” and not two because, well, it’s definitely not free.

Glendale, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
N/A$537.22
To rent (annual cost)
N/A
To own (annual cost)
$537.22

Glendale is the location of choice if Universal Studios is your favorite vacation spot. The theme park is a quick 15-minute drive from Glendale, California.

But you may be seeing stars outside of Hollywood when you discover the housing costs. Glendale barely missed the cut for our renter’s list (it checks in at number 11), but it is the eighth-most expensive city per square foot in the US for homeowners.

For a 1,000-square-foot home, your lifetime cost is $537,220.

In other words, you can live next door to Universal Studios—but you may not be able to afford tickets.

Honolulu, HI

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
N/A$684.31
To rent (annual cost)
N/A
To own (annual cost)
$684.31

Hawaii is one of the country’s most popular destinations spots—there are nearly 250,000 visitors in the state on any given day. While there’s always a deal to be had on a vacation package, it’s a bit trickier to find affordable housing as a full-time resident.

The capital city of Honolulu didn’t make our list for the most expensive cities in which to rent (it comes in at number 12), but it is the third-most expensive city per square foot if you’re looking to buy a home.

Buying a 1,000-square-foot home in Honolulu will set you back a total of $684,310. With a house that expensive, you may not be able to afford many extras—but you would be sitting pretty in paradise. And hey, if you’re still longing for that vacation vibe, you could always sneak a peek at tourists through your kitchen window.

If you decide to rent a storage unit to lower costs, you may want to check out our recommendations for climate-controlled storage companies.

Jersey City, NJ

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$42.33N/A
To rent (annual cost)
$42.33
To own (annual cost)
N/A

Jersey City is a haven for history lovers, and it offers direct boat access to the Statue of Liberty. The glimpse into the past is intoxicating, but you may find yourself wishing for centuries-old housing prices if you decide to move there full time.

The city is seventh on our list of the most expensive places to rent, although it falls all the way to ninetieth when it comes to buying your own home.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, you’re looking at an annual cost of $42,330.

But if housing costs eat up all your spending money, chances are you can find a place on the shoreline to see Lady Liberty for free.

Los Angeles, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$41.97$535.93
To rent (annual cost)
$41.97
To own (annual cost)
$535.93

Los Angeles is your mecca for all things artsy. From checking out the Hollywood sign to attending a Lakers game, you’ll be hard-pressed to find another city with more things to do. It’s also tough to find many places with more expensive housing.

The city checks in at number nine on both of our lists of the most expensive places to rent and own.

Renting a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment will set you back $41,970 over a year. Buying a home with similar square footage will set you back a total of $535,930.

If you’re out of the house at all hours anyway, you may want to consider putting some of your stuff in a U-Haul storage unit—it has 24-hour access at most of its locations.

New York City, NY

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$48.00$667.65
To rent (annual cost)
$48.00
To own (annual cost)
$667.65

If you’re taking a page out of Frank Sinatra’s book and want to wake up in the City That Never Sleeps, we can’t blame you. Where else can you catch a show on Broadway and dine afterward at a Times Square restaurant? And chances are you’ll be sitting next to an actor from Law & Order (the franchise has filmed more than 1,000 episodes in the City That Never Sleeps, and it’s thought of by actors as a “rite of passage”).

But given NYC’s housing costs, you may need the diversion offered by its nonstop entertainment options. New York is the third-most expensive city in the country for renters and the fourth-most costly for buyers.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, you need to come up with $48,000 per year. If you want to buy, plan on dishing out $667,650 for a similarly sized home.

The Big Apple sure has big prices.

Oakland, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$54.02$523.20
To rent (annual cost)
$54.02
To own (annual cost)
$523.20

Oakland is close to many popular vacation spots and also houses the Oakland Aviation Museum—located on the site of the airfield where Amelia Earhart departed on her final flight before disappearing.

You’ll probably wish your rent checks also would fly away when you see the housing costs. Oakland is second on our list of the most expensive cities for renting and tenth for buying.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, plan on watching $54,020 vanish. To buy, expect to say goodbye to $523,200.

Just make sure you’re as hard to find as Earhart if you decide to skip town when your mortgage payment arrives.

San Francisco, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$66.72$1,070.92
To rent (annual cost)
$66.72
To own (annual cost)
$1,070.92

Residents were startled when an earthquake shook Candlestick Park and the city of San Francisco during the 1989 World Series. A massive tremor injured nearly 4,000 people and caused billions of dollars in damage—not to mention delaying the ascent of the Oakland Athletics to the top of the baseball world.

You may feel rumbling on your financial Richter scale when you see what it costs to live here. San Francisco takes the top spot in both of our lists.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, you’re looking at a cost of $66,720 per year—nearly $13,000 more than the second-most expensive city in the country.

Looking to buy instead? It doesn’t get easier: the price is $1,070,920—more expensive than the second-highest option (Boston) by over $300,000.

If San Francisco is definitely your destination, you may want to consider renting a lower-cost storage unit to save cash. We’ve put together a guide to help you estimate the storage unit size you need.

San Jose, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$44.32$625.86
To rent (annual cost)
$44.32
To own (annual cost)
$625.86

San Jose has a lot going for it. The city is home to Silicon Valley and houses tech giants like Adobe, eBay, and Netflix. Venture a little further out and you’ll find headquarters for Google, Apple, and Facebook.

You can be based in San Jose too—for a price. San Jose is the sixth-most expensive city for both renting and buying.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, plan on budgeting $44,320 each year. To buy, expect to pay $625,860.

The good news is the high cost of living might not seem so bad if you turn out to be the next Steve Jobs or Larry Page.

Sunnyvale, CA

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$47.14N/A
To rent (annual cost)
$47.14
To own (annual cost)
N/A

Sunnyvale is home to Yahoo!, LinkedIn, and Jimmy Johnson—a legendary ghost who haunted a local Toys”R”Us store after accidentally hacking off his leg and bleeding to death. “He’s like Casper,” said longtime employee Putt-Putt O’Brien. “Nothing he does ever hurt anybody.”

While gentle Jimmy may be harmless, expect the damage for living costs to feel more real.

Sunnyvale is the fourth-most expensive city for renters but doesn’t make our top 10 list for those looking to buy.

To rent a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment, your yearly bill is going to be $47,140.

Sunnyvale isn’t so sunny when it comes to housing costs.

Washington, DC

Cost per square foot

To rent (annual cost)To own (annual cost)
$42.00$544.87
To rent (annual cost)
$42.00
To own (annual cost)
$544.87

Washington, DC, is your go-to spot for all things political. Local law prohibits any building from being higher than a modest 130 feet, so even the design of the city makes you realize you’re in a different place.

Too bad there isn’t a similar law regulating housing prices. Washington, DC, is the eighth-most expensive city for renters and the seventh-most expensive for buyers.

Renting a 1,000-square-foot one-bedroom apartment in the nation’s capital will set you back $42,000 per year. If you plan to buy, you’re looking at a total cost of $544,870.

Expect to be short on cash if you’re moving to Washington, DC

Additional resources

If you’re shocked by the cost of living in these cities, here are some ways to save money when you move:

2019’s Top 4 Self-Storage Companies
How to Pay for Your Move
The Best Moving Deals and Discounts of 2019

Full data set

10 most expensive - homes

Region nameStateMetroCounty nameSize / RankHome price per sq. ft. (August 2019)
San FranciscoCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardSan Francisco County15$1,070.92
BostonMABoston-Cambridge-NewtonSuffolk County26$742.20
HonoluluHIUrban Honolulu
Honolulu County48$684.31
New YorkNY
New York-Newark-Jersey City
Queens County1$667.65
FremontCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardAlameda County114$648.15
San JoseCASan Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa ClaraSanta Clara County12$625.86
WashingtonDCWashington-Arlington-AlexandriaDistrict of Columbia27$544.87
GlendaleCALos Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimLos Angeles County139$537.22
Los AngelesCALos Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimLos Angeles County2$535.93
OaklandCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardAlameda County45$523.20
Region name
San Francisco
Boston
Honolulu
New York
Fremont
San Jose
Washington
Glendale
Los Angeles
Oakland
State Metro County name Size / Rank Home price per sq. ft. (August 2019)
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward San Francisco County 15 $1,070.92
MA Boston-Cambridge-Newton Suffolk County 26 $742.20
HI Urban Honolulu
Honolulu County 48 $684.31
NY
New York-Newark-Jersey City
Queens County 1 $667.65
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward Alameda County 114 $648.15
CA San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara Santa Clara County 12 $625.86
DC Washington-Arlington-Alexandria District of Columbia 27 $544.87
CA Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim Los Angeles County 139 $537.22
CA Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim Los Angeles County 2 $535.93
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward Alameda County 45 $523.20

10 most expensive - one-bedroom apt.

Region nameStateMetroCounty nameSize / RankOne-bedroom rent price per sq. ft. (August 2019)
San FranciscoCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardSan Francisco County15$5.56
OaklandCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardAlameda County45$4.50
New YorkNYNew York-Newark-Jersey CityQueens County1$4.00
SunnyvaleCASan Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa ClaraSanta Clara County190$3.93
BostonMABoston-Cambridge-NewtonSuffolk County26$3.87
San JoseCASan Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa ClaraSanta Clara County12$3.69
Jersey CityNJNew York-Newark-Jersey CityHudson County86$3.53
WashingtonDCWashington-Arlington-AlexandriaDistrict of Columbia27$3.50
Los AngelesCALos Angeles-Long Beach-AnaheimLos Angeles County2$3.50
FremontCASan Francisco-Oakland-HaywardAlameda County107$3.45
Region name
San Francisco
Oakland
New York
Sunnyvale
Boston
San Jose
Jersey City
Washington
Los Angeles
Fremont
State Metro County name Size / Rank One-bedroom rent price per sq. ft. (August 2019)
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward San Francisco County 15 $5.56
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward Alameda County 45 $4.50
NY New York-Newark-Jersey City Queens County 1 $4.00
CA San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara Santa Clara County 190 $3.93
MA Boston-Cambridge-Newton Suffolk County 26 $3.87
CA San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara Santa Clara County 12 $3.69
NJ New York-Newark-Jersey City Hudson County 86 $3.53
DC Washington-Arlington-Alexandria District of Columbia 27 $3.50
CA Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim Los Angeles County 2 $3.50
CA San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward Alameda County 107 $3.45

Did we help you answer all your storage-related questions? Let us know in the comments section below!

About Julia Campbell

Julia Campbell
Julia Campbell is a full-time writer who knows the tricks of the trade when it comes to planning a hassle-free move. Having moved seven times in the past five years, she draws from her own experience and industry expertise to help you avoid her biggest mistakes (like that time she thought she could get away with packing her dishes without wrapping them first).